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Common Laser Skin Therapy Options In NYC

Hits: 376If aging, acne, or too much time in the sun has left your face with blotches, scars, wrinkles, or lines, laser skin resurfacing may help your skin look younger and healthier.  How laser resurfacing works:...

Residents from Forest Hills hosted the first virtual meeting of the Color of Justice (@COJ_FH) last week.“Forest Hills is a nice place to live,” said COJ president Titilayo Yasukawa. “But far too often Black concerns get overlooked or outright dismissed by other organizations. So we decided to create our own space that empowers its citizens to find solutions through political, civic and legislative engagement.” The goals of COJ include educating residents about local government, community issues, legislative policy, and civic organizations, as well as local elections and candidates running in them. Bigger goals will tackle social justice, inequities in education, housing, public health, and more. They are currently seeking to fill the positions of secretary and treasurer on its board.“Our first objective is to build membership and to educate on the local political process,” said COJ’s vice president Gideon Zvulon. “We want to facilitate access to local government and encourage civic engagement, because it is at this level where critical resources for our community are distributed. We need to ensure that we have a seat at the table in those discussions.”The upcoming local elections were a major topic during the inaugural meeting.“In order to affect change that would affect yourself, or your community starts at the local level,” said Zvulon,. “Our clear and initial choice is to get people involved locally. Secondly, educating people to know politicians who have the best interests at heart, instead of just the ones you know by name.”By Samantha Galvez-Montiel 0

Residents from Forest Hills hosted the first virtual meeting of the Color of Justice (@COJ_FH) last week.“Forest Hills is a nice place to live,” said COJ president Titilayo Yasukawa. “But far too often Black concerns get overlooked or outright dismissed by other organizations. So we decided to create our own space that empowers its citizens to find solutions through political, civic and legislative engagement.” The goals of COJ include educating residents about local government, community issues, legislative policy, and civic organizations, as well as local elections and candidates running in them. Bigger goals will tackle social justice, inequities in education, housing, public health, and more. They are currently seeking to fill the positions of secretary and treasurer on its board.“Our first objective is to build membership and to educate on the local political process,” said COJ’s vice president Gideon Zvulon. “We want to facilitate access to local government and encourage civic engagement, because it is at this level where critical resources for our community are distributed. We need to ensure that we have a seat at the table in those discussions.”The upcoming local elections were a major topic during the inaugural meeting.“In order to affect change that would affect yourself, or your community starts at the local level,” said Zvulon,. “Our clear and initial choice is to get people involved locally. Secondly, educating people to know politicians who have the best interests at heart, instead of just the ones you know by name.”By Samantha Galvez-Montiel

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The Forest Hills Memorial Day Ceremony is only a few weeks away, and organizers met together last week at the American Legion Continental Post 1424 to conduct their final preparations for the event.The occasion will take place on Sunday, May 30, in Remsen Park and pay tribute to all the men and woman who have died while in the U.S. military. Slated to go on for just over an hour, the event will be filled with music, speeches, and honors.This year, the ceremony will not only recognize fallen service members but will also honor the sacrifice of frontline workers. Members of the Forest Hills Volunteer Ambulance Corps will be honored at the event for their efforts in saving the local community from the COVID-19 pandemic.Michael Arcati is commander of Post 1424 and has been a major force in organizing this year’s ceremony. He served in the navy for a combined total of eight years as both a prosecutor and defense counsel. Specializing in international, criminal, and tax law, he’s been awarded the Bronze Star among other military accolades. It was his goal to extend Memorial Day to as many people as possible. “This event is not just for the veterans but for the community and the service that is central to how it functions.”Arcati couldn’t envision honoring sacrifice this year without paying homage those who grappled with the pandemic on behalf of Queens, especially those from the volunteer ambulance service. “Like a military they lined up side by side, and put their lives on the line without question,” he said. “These people never asked for a dime, and they need to be recognized.Read the full story by @andrebeganski by clicking on the link in our bio. 0

The Forest Hills Memorial Day Ceremony is only a few weeks away, and organizers met together last week at the American Legion Continental Post 1424 to conduct their final preparations for the event.The occasion will take place on Sunday, May 30, in Remsen Park and pay tribute to all the men and woman who have died while in the U.S. military. Slated to go on for just over an hour, the event will be filled with music, speeches, and honors.This year, the ceremony will not only recognize fallen service members but will also honor the sacrifice of frontline workers. Members of the Forest Hills Volunteer Ambulance Corps will be honored at the event for their efforts in saving the local community from the COVID-19 pandemic.Michael Arcati is commander of Post 1424 and has been a major force in organizing this year’s ceremony. He served in the navy for a combined total of eight years as both a prosecutor and defense counsel. Specializing in international, criminal, and tax law, he’s been awarded the Bronze Star among other military accolades. It was his goal to extend Memorial Day to as many people as possible. “This event is not just for the veterans but for the community and the service that is central to how it functions.”Arcati couldn’t envision honoring sacrifice this year without paying homage those who grappled with the pandemic on behalf of Queens, especially those from the volunteer ambulance service. “Like a military they lined up side by side, and put their lives on the line without question,” he said. “These people never asked for a dime, and they need to be recognized.Read the full story by @andrebeganski by clicking on the link in our bio.

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Arnold Stone, an award-winning sculptor, painter, illustrator, and a dentist, passed away at 49 in 1971,but his memory is very much alive thanks to Paula Stone Borge, his daughter, and Robert Andrew McKie, his stepson, who are preserving his artwork and sharing stories.

Most recently, the nearly 2-story “Floating Leaves” sculpture fountain of the shuttered Parkside Chapel at 98-60 Queens Boulevard in Rego Park, was relocated off-site. This was after Rego-Forest Preservation Council’s initiative to secure an early 1960s prized work by the late sculptor Arnold Stone to a new home, ideally at a nearby cultural institution. Parkside Chapel by notable architects Henry Sandig and Robert Kasindorf, was designed as tribute to the Israelites, the Ten Commandments, and the Sinai desert, and offered a Modernist twist on traditional symbolism.

: @michaelhperlman 0

Arnold Stone, an award-winning sculptor, painter, illustrator, and a dentist, passed away at 49 in 1971,but his memory is very much alive thanks to Paula Stone Borge, his daughter, and Robert Andrew McKie, his stepson, who are preserving his artwork and sharing stories.

Most recently, the nearly 2-story “Floating Leaves” sculpture fountain of the shuttered Parkside Chapel at 98-60 Queens Boulevard in Rego Park, was relocated off-site. This was after Rego-Forest Preservation Council’s initiative to secure an early 1960s prized work by the late sculptor Arnold Stone to a new home, ideally at a nearby cultural institution. Parkside Chapel by notable architects Henry Sandig and Robert Kasindorf, was designed as tribute to the Israelites, the Ten Commandments, and the Sinai desert, and offered a Modernist twist on traditional symbolism.

: @michaelhperlman

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On May 14, the Midway Theatre at 108-22 Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills reopened its doors. Operator Regal Cinemas decided last fall to close 543 theaters due to the pandemic, and the Midway was one of them.“I thought they were shutting their doors for good, so this is such wonderful news,” said local resident Christina Gennaro. “The history surrounding Forest Hills is what made me want to move here. Movie theaters like the Midway are living history.” With a largely intact vertical beacon, curved façade, and whimsical circular lobby with a sweeping staircase, the Art Moderne theater is one of the borough’s oldest, operating since 1942. The Midway was named after the Battle of Midway in World War II. Opening attractions were the U.S. Navy’s Technicolor short The Battle of Midway, as well as The Pied Piper and Just Off Broadway. Among the celebrities who made appearances were Bob Hope and Lucille Ball, who conducted a meet and greet. Over time, it transitioned from a single screen to a quad to nine screens. In more recent times, digital advances and recliners were introduced.“It holds fond memories,” said Jennifer Vega of the theater. “I’ve went there with my parents and siblings in the 1980s, had dates there in the late 1990s and 2000s, and then watched movies with my son.” The Midway was designed by America’s foremost theater architect, Scotland native Thomas White Lamb, along with consulting architect S. Charles Lee. Today, Tom Andrew Lamb of White Plains is preserving his great-grandfather’s legacy. Click the link in our bio to read the full story by @michaelhperlman 0

On May 14, the Midway Theatre at 108-22 Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills reopened its doors. Operator Regal Cinemas decided last fall to close 543 theaters due to the pandemic, and the Midway was one of them.“I thought they were shutting their doors for good, so this is such wonderful news,” said local resident Christina Gennaro. “The history surrounding Forest Hills is what made me want to move here. Movie theaters like the Midway are living history.” With a largely intact vertical beacon, curved façade, and whimsical circular lobby with a sweeping staircase, the Art Moderne theater is one of the borough’s oldest, operating since 1942. The Midway was named after the Battle of Midway in World War II. Opening attractions were the U.S. Navy’s Technicolor short The Battle of Midway, as well as The Pied Piper and Just Off Broadway. Among the celebrities who made appearances were Bob Hope and Lucille Ball, who conducted a meet and greet. Over time, it transitioned from a single screen to a quad to nine screens. In more recent times, digital advances and recliners were introduced.“It holds fond memories,” said Jennifer Vega of the theater. “I’ve went there with my parents and siblings in the 1980s, had dates there in the late 1990s and 2000s, and then watched movies with my son.” The Midway was designed by America’s foremost theater architect, Scotland native Thomas White Lamb, along with consulting architect S. Charles Lee. Today, Tom Andrew Lamb of White Plains is preserving his great-grandfather’s legacy. Click the link in our bio to read the full story by @michaelhperlman

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