DNR vs Advanced Directive: What’s The Difference?

Hits: 1335

Do not resuscitate (DNR) and advanced directive (AD) are two commonly misunderstood topics in elder law. Typically a consultation with a NY elder law lawyer in order to make an informed decision. But here we are going to review the different aspects of DNR and ADs so you can better understand what is involved with these directives. In best-case scenario, you will be better prepared for any future health decisions that may need to be made by yourself or your loved ones.

What is a do not resuscitate order?

Simply put, a DNR order is an instruction that a healthcare provider issues to a patient, family member, or caregiver who wishes to discontinue all life-sustaining procedures. The provider also confirms the decision in writing with the patient or recipient. The decision is often made by the patient with their family around the same time the will is created. Although creating a will in advance, before anyone is ill or hospitalized can never hurt.

What is an Advanced Directive?

An Advanced Directive is a legal document that allows a person to express his/her healthcare preferences in writing. The person designates a trusted person – like a close relative or caregiver with the guidance of an experienced lawyer- to make decisions for him/her when the care-provider and patient disagree.

What are the differences between an Advanced Directive and DNR?

An Advanced Directive is different from a DNR in that it doesn’t guarantee any specific set of actions. A DNR guarantees that your healthcare providers will discontinue life-sustaining actions and treatments. An Advanced Directive allows for the healthcare team to make the ultimate decision based on what they determine is in your best interest.

While a DNR is often seen as an irreversible end-of-life decision, an Advanced Directive is not always viewed that way. While a patient with an Advanced Directive may or may not want certain treatments or procedures, a patient with a DNR definitely does not wish to have any medical interventions attempted.


When dealing with important legal decision reach out to a local elder and estate lawyer in the area:

Law Offices Of Roman Aminov 147-17 Union Tpke, Queens, NY 11367 (347) 766-2685 https://www.aminovlaw.com/queens-ny-estate-lawyer


Please follow and like us:

You may also like...

1 Response

  1. Barry S Gloger, MD, FAAOS says:

    Unfortunately Mr Aminov’s Treatise couldn’t be more WRONG:

    “Simply put, a DNR order is an instruction that a healthcare provider issues to a patient, family member, or caregiver who wishes to discontinue all life-sustaining procedures.”

    A DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) Order means that if a patient goes into cardiopulmonary arrest, new measures to reverse this condition are not instituted. The patient is allowed to die a natural death (which takes about 4 minutes). It most certainly does not mean that life sustaining measures (respirator, IV Fluids, tube feedings, etc) are discontinued.

    Discontinuing life sustaining measures is usually done on brain dead patients with the consent of the family (sometimes with court order) or under very specific Advanced Directives, again with the consent of the family. The patient is given morphine as a sedative to alleviate any pain, while a natural death occurs.

    “An Advanced Directive is different from a DNR in that it doesn’t guarantee any specific set of actions.”

    An Advanced Directives is a very specific set of instructions to the patient’s proxy and medical staff, detailing how the patient wishes to be be treated under specific conditions.

    Barry S Gloger, MD, FAAOS
    gloger@alum.mit.edu
    —–
    Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery – Emeritus
    SUNY Downstate Medical Center
    —–
    Board of Directors – Emeritus
    NYS Society of Orthopaedic Surgeons
    —–
    Board of Directors – Emeritus
    Kings County Medical Society
    —–
    President Emeritus
    Brooklyn Orthopedic Society

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://foresthillsgardensblog.com/2021/06/09/dnr-vs-advanced-directive-whats-the-difference">
Twitter
INSTAGRAM