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A virtual art contest and breast cancer fundraiser broadcast from Ridgewood Savings Bank in Forest Hills last Friday attracted 33 artists. Money raised from the event benefited Elmhurst Hospital and local nonprofit Paddle For The Cure (PFC).It was produced and co-hosted by this columnist and PFC founder Leah Salmorin. Technical support was provided by Michael Wechsler. Click on the link in our bio to read the story by @michaelhperlman 0

A virtual art contest and breast cancer fundraiser broadcast from Ridgewood Savings Bank in Forest Hills last Friday attracted 33 artists. Money raised from the event benefited Elmhurst Hospital and local nonprofit Paddle For The Cure (PFC).It was produced and co-hosted by this columnist and PFC founder Leah Salmorin. Technical support was provided by Michael Wechsler. Click on the link in our bio to read the story by @michaelhperlman

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Following last year’s wildly successful screenings, the “Free Movie Nights at the Queens Drive-In” program plans on hosting six free events throughout the spring and summer of 2021.“We’re not out of the woods when it comes to COVID-19 just yet, but that doesn’t mean we can’t safely enjoy evenings in Flushing Meadows Corona Park with our family, friends and neighbors,” said Borough President Donovan Richards. “From kids flicks to cinematic classics, there is something for every family to enjoy on the big screen this spring.”The first screening was held on May 4. Appropriately, the original Star Wars was shown to celebrate “May the Fourth Be With You.” Future screenings will include the films Inside Out, Moonlight, Coming to America, Monsoon Wedding, and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. A full list of movies and show times is available at @queensdrivein 1

Following last year’s wildly successful screenings, the “Free Movie Nights at the Queens Drive-In” program plans on hosting six free events throughout the spring and summer of 2021.“We’re not out of the woods when it comes to COVID-19 just yet, but that doesn’t mean we can’t safely enjoy evenings in Flushing Meadows Corona Park with our family, friends and neighbors,” said Borough President Donovan Richards. “From kids flicks to cinematic classics, there is something for every family to enjoy on the big screen this spring.”The first screening was held on May 4. Appropriately, the original Star Wars was shown to celebrate “May the Fourth Be With You.” Future screenings will include the films Inside Out, Moonlight, Coming to America, Monsoon Wedding, and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. A full list of movies and show times is available at @queensdrivein

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Amid rising attacks on Asians, more than 1,000 people took to the streets in Flushing calling for an end to Asian hate crimes.The event was organized by the Borough President’s Office.Mayor Bill de Blasio reminded everyone of the important role Asian Americans have played in shaping the city."If you love New York City, you can’t take the contribution of the Asian-American community out of it,” he said. “The only way we are New York City today is because of what Asian Americans have done for us.”Senator Chuck Schumer spoke of a city of diversity, immigrants and unity and discussed the recently passed “COVID–19 Hate Crimes Act,” which among other things will make the reporting of hate crimes easier.“We want to tell those evil few who propagate the Asian hate that you are not new Yorkers, you are not Americans and under the new law we passed we will prosecute you and give you the punishment you deserve,” he told the crowd.Calling for a unified front against the attacks, Reverend Al Sharpton urged all community leaders to speak out and stop the violence.“When Blacks attack Asians, Black leaders need to stand up,” he said. “When whites attack others, whites need to stand up.”State Senator John Liu became emotional discussing reports of passersby refusing to intervene in some of the attack. He said it made him wonder if Asians are seen as less than human.“We are not dogs,” he said. “We are not the coronavirus. We are people, we are human, we are Americans.”According to the NYPD, in 2020 there was a 1,900 percent increase in attacks on Asians. But a presentative from the Asian American Federation said the statistics represent a huge undercount because many attack go unreported by the victims out of fear of retaliation or that they won’t be taken seriously. 0

Amid rising attacks on Asians, more than 1,000 people took to the streets in Flushing calling for an end to Asian hate crimes.The event was organized by the Borough President’s Office.Mayor Bill de Blasio reminded everyone of the important role Asian Americans have played in shaping the city."If you love New York City, you can’t take the contribution of the Asian-American community out of it,” he said. “The only way we are New York City today is because of what Asian Americans have done for us.”Senator Chuck Schumer spoke of a city of diversity, immigrants and unity and discussed the recently passed “COVID–19 Hate Crimes Act,” which among other things will make the reporting of hate crimes easier.“We want to tell those evil few who propagate the Asian hate that you are not new Yorkers, you are not Americans and under the new law we passed we will prosecute you and give you the punishment you deserve,” he told the crowd.Calling for a unified front against the attacks, Reverend Al Sharpton urged all community leaders to speak out and stop the violence.“When Blacks attack Asians, Black leaders need to stand up,” he said. “When whites attack others, whites need to stand up.”State Senator John Liu became emotional discussing reports of passersby refusing to intervene in some of the attack. He said it made him wonder if Asians are seen as less than human.“We are not dogs,” he said. “We are not the coronavirus. We are people, we are human, we are Americans.”According to the NYPD, in 2020 there was a 1,900 percent increase in attacks on Asians. But a presentative from the Asian American Federation said the statistics represent a huge undercount because many attack go unreported by the victims out of fear of retaliation or that they won’t be taken seriously.

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When Claire Shulman passed away last August at the age of 94, Queens lost one of its greatest advocates. However, the legacy of the borough’s trailblazing first female borough president continues to live on and inspire.On Monday May 3, Borough President Donovan Richards presided over a ceremony unveiling “One Claire Shulman Way” as the vanity address of Borough Hall. “Claire Shulman was a larger-than-life figure who consistently defied expectations with her uncanny ability to get things done for the people of Queens,” said Richards. “Her death last year was a huge loss to all of us who relied on her friendship and counsel, but we keep her legacy and memory alive by permanently and prominently affixing her name to Queens Borough Hall.“From now on, everyone who visits the people’s house will see the name of Claire Shulman and reflect on the great work she did to build a better Queens,” he added. 0

When Claire Shulman passed away last August at the age of 94, Queens lost one of its greatest advocates. However, the legacy of the borough’s trailblazing first female borough president continues to live on and inspire.On Monday May 3, Borough President Donovan Richards presided over a ceremony unveiling “One Claire Shulman Way” as the vanity address of Borough Hall. “Claire Shulman was a larger-than-life figure who consistently defied expectations with her uncanny ability to get things done for the people of Queens,” said Richards. “Her death last year was a huge loss to all of us who relied on her friendship and counsel, but we keep her legacy and memory alive by permanently and prominently affixing her name to Queens Borough Hall.“From now on, everyone who visits the people’s house will see the name of Claire Shulman and reflect on the great work she did to build a better Queens,” he added.

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An art contest is uniting diverse artists from Queens and beyond with a mission of bringing hope for cancer patients. On April 30 at 5:30 p.m., Paddle For The Cure founder Leah Dulce Salmorin and the Forest Hills Times columnist Michael Perlman will co-host an art show on Zoom and Facebook from the landmarked Ridgewood Savings Bank at 107-55 Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills.“Arts For Life” will feature numerous artists competing in the categories of painting, photography, and drawing. Winning artists will donate their artwork to be displayed at the Hope Pavilion Clinic. Entries will be judged by Mervin David, an artist and nurse practitioner with Elmhurst Hospital.They will also receive $100 donated by Ridgewood Savings Bank. Artists who enrolled paid $20, which will benefit Elmhurst Hospital’s Hope Pavilion Cancer Clinic and Paddle For The Cure.“Ridgewood Savings Bank has always been a bank that prides itself on its community.,” said branch manager Nancy Adzemovic. “I want to go out into the community and search for more partnerships.”🖋 @michaelhperlman 📸 @joshuawesoky  107-55 Queens Blvd. (Forest Hills)  @RidgewoodBank 0

An art contest is uniting diverse artists from Queens and beyond with a mission of bringing hope for cancer patients. On April 30 at 5:30 p.m., Paddle For The Cure founder Leah Dulce Salmorin and the Forest Hills Times columnist Michael Perlman will co-host an art show on Zoom and Facebook from the landmarked Ridgewood Savings Bank at 107-55 Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills.“Arts For Life” will feature numerous artists competing in the categories of painting, photography, and drawing. Winning artists will donate their artwork to be displayed at the Hope Pavilion Clinic. Entries will be judged by Mervin David, an artist and nurse practitioner with Elmhurst Hospital.They will also receive $100 donated by Ridgewood Savings Bank. Artists who enrolled paid $20, which will benefit Elmhurst Hospital’s Hope Pavilion Cancer Clinic and Paddle For The Cure.“Ridgewood Savings Bank has always been a bank that prides itself on its community.,” said branch manager Nancy Adzemovic. “I want to go out into the community and search for more partnerships.”🖋 @michaelhperlman 📸 @joshuawesoky 107-55 Queens Blvd. (Forest Hills) @RidgewoodBank

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To online monitors of vaccine falsehoods and hate, the “Disinformation Dozen” are a threat to the public’s health.But to anti-vaxxers, including those who joined a recent campaign along Queens Boulevard in their defense, “Truth Heroes” is a better word to describe them. A recent report by the Center for Countering Digital Hate and Anti-Vax Watch found that the 12 influencers are part of a group that misleads Americans about the safety of the COVID-19 vaccines. The center wants their considerable and lucrative presence removed from social media, a move social media giants like Facebook have opposed.The report succeeded in riling up followers of the anti-vaxxers, culminating in “Truth Week” during the early part of April. 0

To online monitors of vaccine falsehoods and hate, the “Disinformation Dozen” are a threat to the public’s health.But to anti-vaxxers, including those who joined a recent campaign along Queens Boulevard in their defense, “Truth Heroes” is a better word to describe them. A recent report by the Center for Countering Digital Hate and Anti-Vax Watch found that the 12 influencers are part of a group that misleads Americans about the safety of the COVID-19 vaccines. The center wants their considerable and lucrative presence removed from social media, a move social media giants like Facebook have opposed.The report succeeded in riling up followers of the anti-vaxxers, culminating in “Truth Week” during the early part of April.

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The Midway Theatre is slated to reopen on May 14! What are your memories of this historic local preservation? Opened in 1942, the Midway was named after the victorious WWII “Battle of Midway" & designed in the Art Moderne style by America's foremost theater architect Thomas W. Lamb, along with consulting architect S. Charles Lee. Today, the facade & lobby are mostly intact, and the theater features 9 screens & first-run films. 🖋 @michaelhperlman 🍿 Regal UA Midway  108-22 Queens Blvd (Forest Hills) ️ 844-462-7342 0

The Midway Theatre is slated to reopen on May 14! What are your memories of this historic local preservation? Opened in 1942, the Midway was named after the victorious WWII “Battle of Midway" & designed in the Art Moderne style by America's foremost theater architect Thomas W. Lamb, along with consulting architect S. Charles Lee. Today, the facade & lobby are mostly intact, and the theater features 9 screens & first-run films. 🖋 @michaelhperlman 🍿 Regal UA Midway 108-22 Queens Blvd (Forest Hills) ️ 844-462-7342

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#TBT to this Betty Crocker advertisement set at Eddie's Sweet shop from the February 1970 issue of Family Circle magazine. A sweet tooth is in full swing! ️: @michaelhperlman 📸 @feedourbellies 0

#TBT to this Betty Crocker advertisement set at Eddie's Sweet shop from the February 1970 issue of Family Circle magazine. A sweet tooth is in full swing! ️: @michaelhperlman 📸 @feedourbellies

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Legalization of mobile sports betting was included in the final language of this year’s state budget.“We were already facing a budget deficit before the COVID-19 pandemic, so we needed to find additional revenue streams for the state,” Said State Senator Joseph Addabbo of Queens, who has worked to legalize mobile sports betting for over two years. “Legalizing mobile sports betting will bring in the funds needed by the state that will go towards funding our education system, problem gambling awareness programs and creating jobs.”Mobile sports betting will allow people to place wagers on sporting events through their mobile phones or other internet-connected devices. Thirteen other states and Washington D.C. also have legal mobile sports betting.Addabbo argues New Yorkers are already placing mobile sports bets, but they are either going to the illegal market or quickly traveling to neighboring states where it is legal to do so. A study found that in 2019, New York residents wagered $837 million in New Jersey on sports bets. The state senator noted that not only was New York losing revenue to these other outlets, but individuals with gaming addiction issues were not getting the help they needed.“When New York residents travel to other states or participate in the illegal market to place mobile sports wagers, there is no way for us to identify and help them should they have a gaming addiction,” Addabbo said. “By safely legalizing mobile sports betting, New York State can better recognize and assist those with a gambling problem, with the help of the over one-dozen safeguards and measures written into the bill’s language.”The state Gaming Commission will start the creation of the mobile sports betting process and begin to accept bids from sportsbook providers this coming July. Will you bet on sports? Take the poll in our story! 0

Legalization of mobile sports betting was included in the final language of this year’s state budget.“We were already facing a budget deficit before the COVID-19 pandemic, so we needed to find additional revenue streams for the state,” Said State Senator Joseph Addabbo of Queens, who has worked to legalize mobile sports betting for over two years. “Legalizing mobile sports betting will bring in the funds needed by the state that will go towards funding our education system, problem gambling awareness programs and creating jobs.”Mobile sports betting will allow people to place wagers on sporting events through their mobile phones or other internet-connected devices. Thirteen other states and Washington D.C. also have legal mobile sports betting.Addabbo argues New Yorkers are already placing mobile sports bets, but they are either going to the illegal market or quickly traveling to neighboring states where it is legal to do so. A study found that in 2019, New York residents wagered $837 million in New Jersey on sports bets. The state senator noted that not only was New York losing revenue to these other outlets, but individuals with gaming addiction issues were not getting the help they needed.“When New York residents travel to other states or participate in the illegal market to place mobile sports wagers, there is no way for us to identify and help them should they have a gaming addiction,” Addabbo said. “By safely legalizing mobile sports betting, New York State can better recognize and assist those with a gambling problem, with the help of the over one-dozen safeguards and measures written into the bill’s language.”The state Gaming Commission will start the creation of the mobile sports betting process and begin to accept bids from sportsbook providers this coming July. Will you bet on sports? Take the poll in our story!

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POLL: On March 31, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation passed by state lawmakers the night before to legalize recreational marijuana in New York state. The state Senate voted 40-23 to pass the legislation. Later that night, the state Assembly voted 100-49 in favor of the bill.That makes the Empire State the 15th state, along with the District of Columbia, to have legalized cannabis for recreational use.Today, April 20th (4/20), has long been considered an occasion for smoking or celebrating the smoking of marijuana.

Do you plan to smoke now that recreational use of marijuana is legal? Take the poll in our story. 0

POLL: On March 31, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation passed by state lawmakers the night before to legalize recreational marijuana in New York state. The state Senate voted 40-23 to pass the legislation. Later that night, the state Assembly voted 100-49 in favor of the bill.That makes the Empire State the 15th state, along with the District of Columbia, to have legalized cannabis for recreational use.Today, April 20th (4/20), has long been considered an occasion for smoking or celebrating the smoking of marijuana.

Do you plan to smoke now that recreational use of marijuana is legal? Take the poll in our story.

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